Educational Articles

Others

  • Grief is the normal and natural response to the loss of someone or something. When grieving, one is said to be in a state of bereavement. The loss of a pet can cause intense grief and sorrow. Given that so many people consider their pets as members of the family, this grief is normal and understandable. Each person experiences grief in a different way. Contrary to popular belief, grief does not unfold in clean, linear stages, nor does it have a timeline. Grief is a full body experience that includes physical, emotional, cognitive, social, and spiritual responses. A healthy grief journey comes from taking the time to work through feelings rather than trying to push them away, moving toward the experience of loss to learn to live with it. There are many ways to manage grief, including receiving support from others, finding comfort in routines and play, keeping active, taking breaks from the sadness, remembering your pet, memorializing your pet, searching for meaning, and eventually, possibly bringing a new pet into your life. Grieving takes time. Usually it gradually lessens in intensity over time, but if it doesn’t, then professional counseling may help.

  • This handout summarizes the many options available to help celebrate your pet’s life and ways to help deal with your grief following the loss of your beloved pet.

  • Mothballs are solid pesticides that slowly release a vapor to kill and repel moths, their larvae, and other insects from stored clothing and fabric. Mothballs are sometimes also used to repel snakes, mice, and other animals, although this use is not recommended and can be harmful to pets, children, and the environment.

  • If your cat has a complicated condition or is not getting well, you may want to seek a specialist referral or a second opinion. Your veterinarian will likely help you get this set up as they want what is best for your pet. You will likely need to travel in many situations for a specialty referral.

  • If your dog has a complicated condition or is not getting well, you may want to seek a specialist referral or a second opinion. Your veterinarian will likely help you get this set up as they want what is best for your pet. You will likely need to travel in many situations for a specialty referral. 

  • House paint, art paint, varnishes and other decorative or protective solvents come in many varieties… and most are dangerous to dogs and cats. Water-based paints, the most common, include latex, tempera, and poster paints.

  • Pet health insurance policies are primarily designed to cover accidents and illnesses. Pet insurance policies do not cover pre-existing conditions, and some have bilateral exclusions, meaning for example, if one knee has required ligament surgery, the other knee is automatically excluded for the same condition. Synthesized information about coverage and exclusions can be found on aggregator sites, such as PetInsuranceInfo (petinsuranceinfo.com). The factors that affect premiums include age, species, breed, the region you live, deductible amounts, co-insurance, and in some cases annual payout limits. Generally, it is less expensive to insure your pet when it is young and healthy, rather than waiting until it is older and more prone to illness. Educate yourself to understand the terms and conditions of the pet insurance you buy for your pet.

  • Dogs do so much more than entertain us with tricks or accompany us on walks. Their abilities as service dogs are astounding. Gaining in popularity, dogs that assist people who have seizures play an important role in the lives of their owners.

  • Skunks spray volatile compounds from their anal sacs if they feel threatened by a potential predator such as a dog. Dogs can come across a skunk in rural or urban areas but most often at dawn or dusk and in areas where skunks make their den. Avoiding these areas at these times is the best way to avoid a skunk encounter. If sprayed in the face your dog may need veterinary care, as corneal damage can occur if sprayed in the eyes, and vomiting, diarrhea, or anemia can result if sprayed in the mouth. Washing the offending oils from the dog is complicated, but there are several commercial skunk shampoos that are good for this. If these are not available a combination of hydrogen peroxide, baking soda, and dish soap can be used to help in the short term. It is important to avoid getting this solution in the eyes or mouth as the ingredients can be irritating and create more problems. Skunks may carry rabies so avoid contact between them and your dog.

  • There are over 30,000 species of spiders worldwide, and most of these spiders are venomous. Most spiders are unable to produce medically-significant envenomations, however, because of their small mouthparts that are unable to penetrate the skin. The two groups of spiders responsible for most medically-significant spider bites include the widow spiders (including the black widow spider) and the recluse spiders (including the brown recluse).